Published Wednesday , on 29 March 2017, 13:18:10 by Christophe Hitayezu

By Christophe Hitayezu

  • Kigali, 29 March 2017: The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations launches a 1 million 600 hundred USD project for more effective and sustainable investment in water for poverty reduction in six African countries.

This project to be implemented in Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mali, Niger, Tanzania and Rwanda, is expected to help farmers to improve water resources management.

According to the project coordinator, it offers a set of concrete, evidence-based recommendations and tools in prioritising and planning water-related interventions, in support of smallholder farmers for donors, policymakers, the private sector, communities and individual farmers.

Attaher Maiga, FAO Rwanda representative, said the efficient use of water will decrease climate change related consequences.

"We are in the area of climate change, we know Rwandan Agriculture depends on rain, this is why we believe it is important to have a good management of water resources in the country, so that farmers can use them more efficiently. Rwanda has a lot of water, the management of the water resources is an important aspect that need consideration." Maiga said.

"It makes sense to invest in use of water for basically the smallholder because their livelihood depends heavily on the water availability" he added.

Attaher Maiga, FAO Rwanda representative [Photo: Nyandwi Alexis]

Innocent Nzeyimana, the head of husbandry, irrigation and Mechanisation department in Rwanda Agriculture Board, said Rwanda has enough water resources with an aggregate of two hundred million Cubic Meters which can irrigate more than 600 hundred hectares, unfortunately, only 7% of this farmland is irrigation.

Innocent Nzeyimana, the head of husbandry, irrigation and Mechanisation department in Rwanda Agriculture Board [Photo: Nyandwi Alexis]

Eugene Ntagengerwa, a farmer from Bugesera District, said irrigation projects are improving agriculture but they have some challengers including shortage of pipes.